How industrial lighting experts comprehensively dissect the color temperature of LED lamps

Choosing the right led lamps, with its long-lasting, energy efficient, cost saving, rugged design concepts and environmental advantages, led lamps have become more and more popular in our daily life. Because it offers these obvious advantages to enhance our lighting environment, how to choose the right led lights seems to be a must consider. What is the right color temperature as well as the right atmosphere? Let the industrial lighting experts at Mega Lighting take us a step further in choosing the right LED fixtures by following our knowledge of color temperature.

What is color temperature? Color temperature is the color of an LED lamp, measured in degrees Kelvin. From a lighting perspective, most LED lights cite a white color temperature, and there are usually three shades of white light: warm white, pure/natural white, and cool white. Using sunlight as an example, we can easily understand the different levels of color temperature. Noon time is bright, more beautiful light close to the equator. At sunrise and sunset the lights light up a yellow, or even red color. Lower color temperatures will have more yellow, and higher color temperatures will go from yellow, to pure white, and finally to bluish. Generally speaking, warm white LED light refers to the white, yellowish type and cool white LED light bright blue-white. In between, lies daylight "pure white", quite a lot of white kind of white.

Regarding the various color temperatures, the relevant definitions: warm white: usually from 2600K--3500K; pure white: usually from 4000K--5000K; cool white: usually higher than 5500K. It should be pointed out here that there is no uniform standard for the naming of color temperature. standard. Some people call it cool white such as daylight, natural white, cold white. Different companies may have different naming rules for warm, pure or cool, but the number is not much difference. Since there is a wide variety of nomenclature, it would be better to identify the color of light with the Kelvin temperature scale to avoid confusion. Why use temperature colors? Doesn't light have a "temperature"? So why do we use this word and what does it do to the color? For example, when a black object like a piece of iron is heated, its color changes with the temperature of the heating. It turns out that it is very useful to describe the range of white light colors in terms of hue. As the iron heats up, it begins to emit red light. As it heats up more and more, its color changes to orange and you can actually tell its temperature by measuring its color.

What is the best color temperature for LEDs for your application? Since color temperature is an aesthetic choice, everyone is likely to have their own preferences for each setting and application. Here are some general criteria for choosing LED color temperature applications. Warm white is preferred forinterior lighting in the home, like dining, living and reception areas, where we want a looser environment that gives us a slightly more reddish effect and makes us feel warm and cozy. Pure white lends itself to task performing kitchens and bathrooms. Some of the retail stores and offices are also with Pure White, which makes us feel more energized and helps us to focus our work Cool White is best in outdoor applications such as industrial and commercial areas such as warehouses and hospitals. Especially for some jewelry shows, cool white lighting can raise people's attention and emphasize and make clear diamonds, silver and jewels shine.

To sum up, consider choosing a suitable led light, the choice of color temperature, including other details and information, you must make a judgment in advance, recolux is committed to the research and development of medium and high-end LED industrial lighting fixtures, production, sales in one of the integrated lighting enterprises, consumers can use different color temperature according to their own preferences.

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